Nze Nwankpo finally Open Up – Why I left APGA to ADC

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Governorship candidate of the African Democratic Party (ADC) in the November 6 election in Anambra state, Chief Akachukwu Nwankpo has explained the reasons behind his move from the All Progressive Grand Alliance (APGA) to his new party.

Nwankpo who was disqualified by the leadership of his former party a few days to its primary said he had to join the ADC to enable him actualize his gubernatorial dreams.

Speaking to The Nation on Saturday, Nwankpo, former Presidential Aide to ex-President Goodluck Jonathan, accused APGA Chairman, Victor Oye of being responsible for his disqualification.

He however absolved Governor Willie Obiano of his travails, describing him as a simple man who disliked dirty politics.

He said, “Obiano doesn’t run APGA. He’s the BOT chairman. The man that runs APGA is called Victor Oye. He’s the party chairman. Obiano is just the governor and if you go close to him, you’ll discover that this kind of politics of twist and thorns turns him off. It’s not his style.

“Obiano is 100 percent innocent. The person responsible for my disqualification is called Victor Oye. He’s a man of a different character. He has a conviction and followed it irrespective of the party rules.

“I didn’t leave APGA, APGA left me. When a qualified man is disqualified, how else can you interpret it? I never left APGA. While in APGA, I respected their rules, I never abused any candidate, I was honorable in all my dealings with them.

“I even waited for them till 23rd evening, hoping to be called back, but they departed with one man and he’s my friend. Since they left me, what do you want me to do? Abandon myself?

“When a party is bad, you can’t expect good governance. When party leaders lack civil behaviors, you’ll see the disorder in them will manifest in the party.

“Look at the disgrace the state is going through, that individuals can’t run a political party and organise a decent primary. See what they’ve made of us.”

The guber candidate however was optimistic that ADC would provide an opportunity for him to serve the people of the state the way his heart was burdened to do.

“After reflection, I decided to respond to the opportunity staring me on the face, which is ADC. There are no conflicts between my dream to serve the state and where I was denied the opportunity to do so.

“People should understand that this is a political dialogue, and you must locate yourself where you can be divinely used to serve,” he added.